TurtleBeach Stealth 600 Gen 2 – review

When the TurtleBeach Stealth 600 launched in 2017 we at EAX were fortunate enough to give it a good review.  It showed great promise for a first-generation headset.  We were thoroughly impressed and apart from a few small niggles the Stealth 600 had massive potential as a wireless headset.  Jump forward 3 years and we find ourselves with the Stealth 600 Generation 2 in our hands, ready to review...  Lets' see if TurtleBeach has listened to their customers and made the Gen 2 a true upgrade.  TurtleBeach took a bold stand when they decided to release the Stealth 600 Gen 2 so close to next-generation consoles being launched.  Fortunately, TurtleBeach has already confirmed that the Stealth 600 Gen 2 will be compatible with next-gen consoles. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZAs8GEQwsE

Design

The Gen 2 Stealth 600 looks nearly identical to the Gen 1.  The only change that can be seen is the mic can now fold up against the left earcup, which gives it a much cleaner look overall.  The general build is still more budget, although that seems to be the bracket that TurtleBeach is planning for the Gen 2.  The mostly plastic build of the Gen 2, does have its own advantage.  Being mostly plastic the Gen 2 is extremely light even in wired headset terms.  This is something that people need to be aware of as some people prefer a little more weight, but each to his or her own.   One of the big problems we had with the Gen 1 Stealth 600 was the fact that the earcup cushioning, although soft, was scratchy and after wearing for an extended time would become itchy and extremely hot.  We are pleased to say the earcup cushioning has been substantially improved.  It now features a leatherette cover which is lovely on the ears.  Like the Gen 1, the earcups are designed to accompany users who where spectacles, this has always been a very nice touch from TurtleBeach.  Although all of these mentioned improvements have improved the comfort dramatically, the only problem we found in the comfort department is the size of the earcups.  The Gen 1 Stealth 600 headsets were exceptionally small earcups.  If you have regular-sized ears, you might have had problems using the Gen 1 Stealth 600's as over-ear headsets and rather use them as on-ear.  With the Gen 2 however the earcup size has been increased, not quite as much as might be needed, but improvement is good.  The earcups are on a swivel which is nice to have the headset "mold" to the wearer. The headband, like in the the Gen 1, slides easily to adjust to nearly any sized head.  The foam on the headband feels good and after some serious game time, we didn't experience any sore heads from a headband.  The mic might feel abit too cheap but fortunately, the mic and the headset can handle some punishment.

Features & Audio

In terms of audio, the Stealth 600 boasts 50mm drivers and, if you using it on Xbox, uses Windows Sonic Audio.  Obviously using something like WIndows Sonic Audio will make an audio improvement, we tested the Stealth 600 on PC, without Dolby or Sonic Audio enabled.  The Stealth 600 sound is very good and could be compared to its bigger brother the Atlas in terms of audio quality.  In previous TurtleBeach we often found the audio to be too tinny and focusing too much on the highs and mids and not enough rumble down low.  Once again TurtleBeach has listened to their customers and tuned the audio, even with standard settings, to be really strong in all spectrums.  There is the standard audio presets, Superhuman Hearing, as a standard with all turtlebeach headsets, lets you hear the smaller sounds like footsteps much better.  Other settings are treble boost, which only boosts the highs, and bass+trebble boost, which was my preferred setting.     When it comes to features, that is where the Stealth series, in general, falls flat.  It is a bare-bones headset featuring little to no creature-comforts.  This is all ways to keep the price tag to the lower end of course so it is a catch 22.  The Gen 2, however, does have a flip to mute mic now which when extended will activate the mic and when flipped up, you will be automatically muted.  The Gen 2 mic also features larger and higher sensitivity which makes an already clear mic sound even crisper.  It also features mic monitoring feedback, which is a nice feature for a budget wireless headset.  No more accidental shouting over the mic in the middle of the night! The standard features are all here, the volume wheel is situated under the earcup. right next to the volume wheel is the chat-audio mixer wheel.  Which should be a standard amongst all headsets but for some reason, it is not yet!  Last but not least there is a power button, charging port, and audio preset selector.  The TurtleBeach Stealth 600 Gen 2 connects via Bluetooth using a dongle that comes with the headset.  you simply plug it into your console or pc and turn on your headset.  Once connected the dongle, as well as the headset, will give you a light and audio queue respectively.  What needs to be mentioned is that only the PS and PC version of the Stealth 600 require the Bluetooth dongle, if you are using the Xbox version, thanks to the Xbox Bluetooth the headset connects directly to the console.     During our time spent with the Stealth 600 we jumped between titles like R6 Siege, Warzone, and some Apex Legends.  What we all agree on is that the audio quality is brilliant.  The Stealth 600's punch way above their price class and makes things sound the way we think they are intended to.  At first I did find myself fumbling with the buttons setting the wrong setting, but once I memorized the positions the controls are rather easy to manage.  Battery life on the Stealth 600 is rated at a decent 15 hours on a single charge.  I charged it when I received it and my rough calculation says that 15 hours sound like an easily achievable mark.  This however is the same battery life as the Gen 1, which is a little disappointing seeing as there was no improvement made in that department.  

Verdict

The TurtleBeach Stealth 600 Gen 2 had a rather tricky mountain to climb left by its predecessor.  Being a generally good headset but lacking a few key elements left us very interested in what TurtleBeach might do with their second outing.  We are pleased to see that they have done more right than wrong!  Improving the comfort and audio quality, making the mic more versatile has all but made the Gen 2 the perfect budget-friendly wireless headset.  The earcups could be slightly bigger but apart from that the Gen 2 can't be faulted and anyone picking them up are sure to be happy with them!        

Special thanks to Apex Interactive for the review content

     
Read more

Crash Bandicoot 4: It’s About Time – Review

If you were a kid at the time that the mighty PS1 was in its prime then you surely spent significant time playing Crash Bandicoot.  Since then Crash and his marsupial friends have enjoyed many outings, originally under Naughty Dog, and later Activision.   Although it has taken more than 20 years for a full-fledged Crash game to make its appearance, It's About Time states it perfectly...  IT'S ABOUT TIME! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CCum266l1vY The biggest risk that comes with sequels or remakes that only happen many years after the original is that fans might have moved on, or got tired of waiting.  And if your fans have moved on, is it even worth still making the game at the risk of it doing badly?  And are the new gamers interested in revisiting a formula that was popular two decades ago?

The Test of Time...

When Crash Bandicoot debuted back in 1997 it had good competition in the linear-platforming genre in the likes of Croc.  Since then the Linear-platform genre has become less popular with other titles like Super Mario Odyssey opting to go towards a more open-world sandbox nature.  Crash Bandicoot 4 has stuck with what made it successful all these years later.  A more refined, albeit linear, level. Fans of old will be happy to see that their furry friend still bounces, spins, and crashes ( get it...)  through vibrant and colorful spectacles that we call levels.  Fans that are new to the Crash Bandicoot franchise will quickly be drawn into the box smashing fun.  In short, Crash Bandicoot has not missed a beat in the time he has been missing.

Welcome to the '90s

Starting up the game the first option you get is whether you want to play Retro, or modern.  I would suggest going with modern as Retro will have you only receiving limited amounts of attempts and retries where modern gives you endless lives and checkpoints, trust me, you will need them! Not much has changed in the formula for Its About Time from the previous games.  It's About Time still focuses on players needing to let Crash run down a hallway, crashing, smashing, and bashing their way through boxes and bad guys all while collecting items.  At times the perspective might change with Crash running away from the camera rather than towards, as well as the occasional side-scrolling stages.  Mix in a few boss battles and you have the general play of Crash Bandicoot.  This might seem a bit mundane and old for the current crop of gamers seeing that we have games where you need to invest serious time and brainpower to play, but It's About Time just feels right! It's About Time has added a good few aspects to the Crash games to give this one some more flavor.  The boss battles are really intense and where one wrong move, much like the other stages, will have you reset to a previous checkpoint.  Another large and challenging introduction is the ability to use masks that grant you temporary powers.  The normal protection mask will have you absorb one hit from an enemy that would usually have killed you.  The other is a kind of time-shift mask that when activated will have you "phase" objects in and out of existence allowing you to traverse the environment.  Need to jump across a large ravine?  Phase the block in your way, out of existence, but be careful, the platform you need to land on is also phased out now...  This leads to a lot of mid-air swearing as well as even more button mashing.  Other masks grant abilities such as slowing down time, manipulate gravity, and make Crash move ridiculously fast! Something that It's About Time does well is despite the fact that we are in 2020, it is purposefully stuck in the '90s.  A time that bad jokes and attitudes were plentiful.  Not exactly to everyone's taste.  Hence the dialogue and cutscenes might not be to everyone's taste but it does definitely deliver a good story, although you will find yourself skipping cutscenes.  Not because they are bad, just due to the fact that you are bound to see them a few times.

What is it all about?

Unlike most of the games in recent times, It's About Time has a refreshingly straightforward storyline.  The usual suspects, N. Tropy, Dr N Gin, Dr N Brio and Dr Neo Cortex ( read that again slowly)  want to get hold of the above mentioned Quantum masks, to harness their dimension altering powers.  Crash and his fellow crew needs to stop these evil-doers from getting the masks as they start to open up interdimensional rifts. Luckily Crash is not alone in this fight to save the galaxy.  He has 4 other characters that are all playable and bring their own abilities to the table.  Coco and Crash are nearly identical apart from looks.  Tawna, Dingodile, and Neo Cortex will bring new abilities to platforming and will have you replaying levels that you have previously completed.  Tawna has a grappling hook you can use to get to faraway platforms.  Dingodile can vacuum up TNT boxes and shoot it back at enemies.  And Neo Cortex can blast enemies with his ray gun and turn them into platforms to jump from.

What is new?

The developers have made a good quality of life changes to the franchise.  Apart from the before mentioned Retro and Modern mode, there are more subtle changes.  One for subtle but very nice one is the introduction of small shadows of where your character will land when jumping.  Previously you would have to rely on some questionable depth perception and luck.  Now, having a clear indication of where your character is heading, if you are more sadistic, this option can be turned off. Keeping with the '90s where co-op was kind due to internet technology being sketchy at best for the lucky few who had.  Pass & Play is a pseudo local multiplayer where each time you die or reach a checkpoint you can pass the controller to a fellow player.  Not quite multiplayer but it does add a fun way of getting players that are not good at platforming to have some fun while having a better player help them through the tricky parts.  

Verdict

Crash Bandicoot 4 It's About Time is an expensive game, there is no mistake about it.  The is around R1 199 for the disc version.  This is a bitter pill to swallow considering the other big titles that are inbound.  But for those who are unsure whether to spend the hard-earned money on your favorite orange marsupial, I can honestly tell you it is worth it.  It's About Time will have you spending hours upon hours trying to capture every last gem, and discovering every last secret level.  The replayability is amped up even more post-credits with the N.Verted mode which mirrors the layout of the original levels but masks them in a visual filter that will make you sweat all over again!    

special thanks to Prima Interactive for the review content

 
Read more

Logitech G102 Lightsync – Review

Logitech started making mice before many of us were even on this earth.  Logitech was already redefining what a mouse should be when most people were still wondering why your home computer would need a rodent attached to it.  What this means is that Logitech is a tried and tested brand and for that specific reason, many big organizations want to, and do, work with them and are sponsored by the giant that is Logitech. When they bring out a mouse, be it a new generation of an old classic, or a completely new design entirely, we should sit up and take note, as well as notes... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbpkm_S1gQc

Design

The G102 has been around for some time now, first making its debut to the world in 2016.  Not much has changed since then but then again, don't fix what 'ain't broke.  Logitech claims the G102 to be a wired gaming mouse.  in comparison to what most of us see gaming mice to be, the G102 is rather subdued and understated. The G102 retains the form of many of the legendary Logitech mice, most recently, the G Pro, that most esports athletes swear by.  Many iterations of this shape and size have been copied and tried by various brands but Logitech, in the G102, G305, and G Pro variants, has perfected it.  The smooth and symmetrical design that features 6 buttons can be found in a white or black finish. The G102 is on the smaller side of the scale in size and weight.  It is only 116mm long, 62mm wide, and stands 38mm high.  It has a non-braided USB cable that is 2m long.  If you want to be extremely critical of the G102 in terms of design, the few downfalls of it can only be the fact that the cable is not braided and that the weight can not be adjusted.  But looking at its roughly R600 price tag, you would be hardpressed to find these features on similarly priced mice.

Performance

The G102 weighs in at 85g which is a good weight for the size.  Not too light but not too much resistance when flicking or dragging.  Logitech has embedded the Mercury sensor inside this little mouse.  According to Logitech, the Mercury sensor is a gaming sensor, which gives you control of the sensitivity from 200 to 8000DPI.  Many of the more premium mice might have the ability to go to 16 000 DPI but realistically one would never need a DPI setting much higher than even 2000.  Where the G102 does make up for the lack of DPI is in the polling rate.  This means the G102 reports back to the PC up to 1000 times per second.  This is the main reason why the G102 movements and clicks feel much more instantaneous. When using it for gaming the G102 performs really well with the scroll wheel having enough resistance to give you a good bump when it jumps over to next slot which is great when switching between weapons in most games.  There is a distinct feel when rolling the scroll wheel which will eliminate possible bumps causing scrolling to happen.

Lightsync

According to Logitech, Lightsync is described as follows:  LIGHTSYNC technology immerses you into the action with automatic, game-driven lighting effects that react to many popular games. LIGHTSYNC will blast light to match in-game explosions, approaching enemies, damage taken, healing is done, new worlds visited, and much more. What this means is that many of the newer titles, much like Razer Synapse, links with the Logitech GHub and syncing up with Lightsync can make the RGB features of all Lightsync compatible items, link up to create a colorful vista of lights that don't only make things look pretty but actually serve a purpose.  Like acting as health bars, or directions to your next objective. On the G102 there is an RGB Halo that wraps around the palm area of the mouse as well as the usual G emblem that is both capable of supporting up to 16.8 million colors as well as a host of presets that can be defined in the Ghub.  My firm favorite on the white G102 is the rainbow effect.  The white G102 simply allows the colors to really pop and I found myself wanting more "halo-like" RGB bands around more of my peripherals...  I think I might have become one of... them...  RGB fanboys...

GHUB

Logitech G102 Review Logitech's GHUB software does what most other software packages do, but its packaged in a sleek, easy to use program.  Adjust your DPI settings by predefining 5 steps that can be jumped through by simply hitting your DPI button found in front of your scroll wheel.  Assign macro keys to the two inner thumb buttons by simply jumping to the assignment screen and selecting what you want those keys to do.  You can even take it one step further and let Ghub recognize the game you are playing and let it switch between macros you have assigned for each game.  This means taking some time, in the beginning, to set it all up but from there on, simply jump into your favorite game and have all your abilities at your fingertips.

Verdict

The Logitech G102 Lightsync might not bring a plethora of features and functions, it might not even spark an outcry over its futuristic design.  But it pairs a proven design with a more-than-capable sensor and slapped some good looking RGB on it.  Coming in at a nearly non-existent price of roughly R600 you will be hardpressed to find a piece of kit that can match the G102 for value for money.  The G102 might not be for those who don't like smaller mice but other than that and a lack of a braided cable, there is no reason why the G102 should not be the go-to mouse for those who want to have something they can use for office work and seamlessly use for gaming when they have a few minutes to spare.      

Special thanks to Logitech for the review products

   
Read more

Roccat Horde AIMO – Review

When Roccat announced the Horde AIMO and marketed it as a "best of both worlds" hybrid mechanical keyboard I was intrigued.  Taking the having the precise linear distinction of mechanical keys, paired with the soft and quiet sound and feel of a membrane keyboard seemed to be a fantastic combination.  Making the keys low profile even upped the excitement by another notch.  But this was not the only aspect of the Roccat Horde AIMO that had people excited.  While bringing the best of both, the Horde AIMO would bring a host of popular gaming keyboard features such as programmable keys, RGB control, multimedia keys to name but a few.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZZChgahBzs

Design

Opening the Roccat Horde AIMO and taking it out of its box, you instantly feel that it feels old school.  Generally, that would insight a feel of quality, in this case, it feels more like old design and build quality.  What needs to be said is that the Horde AIMO is big, no I mean VERY big!  A large part of this size is taken up by the removable wrist rest, which is rather flimsy but not having it attached does make the edges of the Horde a bit rough.  If you are someone who likes symmetry and things to be either straight-edged or rounded, the Horde AIMO is not always sure who it is catering for.  With rounded finishes here and sharp, straight edges there, it is not quite sure what design it wants to follow.  The left side looks sleek and has perfectly placed macro keys.  On the right, it has a host of keys and features that can be found on most gaming keyboards in recent years.  The large dial on the top right can be used as a Windows 10 scroller wheel straight out of the box, and when paired with the feature keys, can be used to scroll through RGB settings and many more, nice feature and always handy when wanting to turn the volume up or down.  The top left seems to feature a cellphone holder like many of the older Roccat keyboards used to have but upon closer inspection, it seems to not be so. Roccat claims that the "memhanical" keys are a mixture of the precise and linear movements of mechanical keys and the soft and quiet of membrane keys.  Roccat also claims that the keys don't need to be pressed all the way to actuate, upon using and testing I find the statement to be not true.  The buttons would only actuate when bottomed out, not a deal-breaker by any means, but if you have ever experienced a true mechanical keyboard with either the Cherry MX Brown or Logitech's Romer G-switch, you will know how pleasant it is.  The low profile of the Horde AIMO keys also lends itself more to a membrane feel rather than mechanical.  For general use, the keys feel springy and don't provide quite as much resistance as what I would expect.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2x_FmAK7a8   The 5 programmable macro keys that are found down the left side of the keyboard has become a standard amongst most full-size gaming keyboards.  The Roccat Horde AIMO however, does have a long row of keys and a large dial on the top right side.  The dial is not only a volume knob when used in conjunction with the multimedia buttons, not only can the RGB effects be changed, but screens can be changed and RGB brightness adjusted. This all sounds fantastic and works well in principle but in reality, it makes for a lot of tedious pressing and unpressing of the desired function that it becomes more of a hassle than it needs to be.  The idea is great, and if music is your main use for the Horde AIMO it will serve you well but for everything else, the software does a more than adequate job.

Software

The Roccat Swarm software has been known as one of the more reliable software packages over the years, and with this being my first dabble with Roccat, I had to scratch around a bit to find out how the latest version of Swarm compares. What I did notice is that it seems that Swarm does suffer from a few bugs at present.  Not only are you never sure if you have the latest version installed, the updater pop-up jumps out warning you that you are outdated, straight after updating.  But when making changes you should not click apply and then OK.  By doing this it seemingly reverts to defaults and you start the process over again.  Simply pressing OK and continuing stores the changes.     Another bummer for MMO fans is the lack of on-the-fly Macro recording which makes casting a vast array of spells or attacks in quick succession rather cumbersome.  Roccat's AIMO RGB is described as a clever system that adjusts the RGB lighting to what you are playing.  I agree that the colouring is interesting although I can't quite put a finger on what it is using to decide its colouring.  On the Roccat Kone AIMO mouse the lighting is bright and really beautiful, the Horde, however, is hardly noticeable in a well-lit room.  

Performance

The Roccat Horde AIMO happily taps away at nearly everything you throw at it.  Be it playing CS:GO, some Rainbow Six Siege or Flight Simulator.  Typing is as pleasurable as typing can generally be.  But nothing quite sets the experience apart from a good quality office keyboard, let alone a mechanical keyboard.  Yes the Horde AIMO is cheaper than mechanical and more expensive than an office keyboard.  That is why it finds itself in an awkward grey area. But, then again, it also did not perform tremendously better than a mechanical keyboard...  

Verdict

The Roccat Horde AIMO can be given credit for trying.  The membrane-mechanical keys, the AIMO lighting effects, and the many uses of the dial.  Did they all work out to the way Roccat planned? Probably not, but they are by no means terrible. The Horde AIMO will definitely not suit those aiming for top spots in competitive gaming but for those who are willing to look past the questionable looks and slightly elevated price tag compared to other membrane keyboards.  Then the Roccat Horde AIMO is your keyboard.  I would personally hold off until they launch the next iteration where they possibly fix the shortcomings of this version.    

Special thanks to Apex Interactive for the review content

     
Read more

Roccat Kain 122 & 200 AIMO – Review

If the 2 X back-to-back Blockbuster Video Game Champ chooses Roccat as his weapons of choice they have to make a good product right?  Roccat is a German peripheral-making company that has recently been acquired by Turtle Beach.  Roccat has decided to enter the highly contested gaming mouse terrain, taking on big names such as Logitech, Razer, and Corsair to name but a few heavyweights.  The Germans are renowned for making perfectly engineered equipment.  We had the privilege of getting our hands on the Roccat Kain 122 (wired) AIMO as well as the Kain 200 (wireless).  Can these German-engineered mice show the other heavyweights in the industry that simple and clean designs and Roccat's new TITAN click technology can set these mice apart?  Let's find out!   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NO7dghZD8_o

Design

The Roccat Kain pairing is the first Roccat-made mice that I have had the pleasure to test and put through their paces.  I naturally went and did some research and checked the previous mice that came from the Roccat stable.  It is safe to say the Kain 122 and its wireless brother, the 200, carry the family resemblance, albeit a striking one.  The Kain AIMO has a narrow design and with a rather raised arch, it allows for a very comfortable grip and resting for hands of all sizes.  It slants off to the right allowing for a more natural grip when holding it but also means that the Kain AIMO is a right-hand-only mouse.  The two buttons located on the inner-right is perfectly placed.  Some brands place their inner-programmable keys too high or too low, causing the user to either accidentally press the keys when moving the mouse, or having to regrip to reach them.  The Kain has got the positioning spot-on, easily accessible yet not accidentally pressed.     The left and right mouse buttons are not placed next to each other like most mice are.  there is a strip of brushed metal dividing the two keys which adds to the straight and square lines that dominate the Kain design.  At the top of this brushed metal piece, there is a DPI button, neat and square, elegant yet functional use of a button that has hampered many brands in their sleekness of design.  Not to mention the scroll wheel that protrudes the brushed metal strip.  The left and right mouse buttons     The sleek and smooth design of the Kain AIMO range and lack of any rubbery grips makes for a very appealing look but the smooth finish can, for some, make the Kain feel slippery.  With the Kain 122 weighing in at a middle-of-road 89g ( Kain 200 weighs 105g) meaning it is light enough to be able to whizz it across your mousepad without feeling like you have nothing in your hand, and not sacrificing the feeling of quality.  Unlike many of the bigger brands, the Kain-range has no weight adjustment, although I think Roccat got the weighting just right.  

Performance

Both the Kain 122 and 200 are fitted with the Roccat signature Owl-Eye Optical sensor which is good for up to 16 000DPI.  This is substantially higher than many other mice in the same price bracket.  Although 16 000 DPI is generally way too high for any sane person.  a realistic maximum DPI would be more in the range of 3 200, but much like kilowatt rating in cars, it's more for show than anything else.  Roccat has its own software called Swarm.  This allows you to save up to five profiles to the mouse, as well as assign keys to the programmable buttons, change the RGB lighting and program your DPI steps that can be flicked through using the DPI button located in the middle of the two mouse buttons.     Roccat has taken the mouse-click and thought about how to improve something we have taken for granted since the birth of the gaming mouse.  By simply repositioning the switch to a more natural location, the new Roccat Titan switch feels more distinguished and more precise.  The buttons are also hinged giving it a cushioned feel when clicking.  Although the Swarm software is not nearly as refined as Ghub from Logitech or Synapse from Razer, it is extremely straightforward, and apart from a small struggle we had to save DPI settings to the mouse, Roccat Swarm was extremely straight forward and provided great explanations of what each setting would do. Both the Kain -122 and the 200 feature phenomenal thresholds for acceleration with the minimum being 40g and the maximum of 400IPS (inches per second).  Basically said, even if you have superhuman flick ability in your favorite shooter, you will not be able to blame the Roccat Kain 122 or 200 for not being able to keep up with your speed. Kain 200   Some of the features that set the Kain 200 apart from its wired brother, is obviously the wireless part.  The Kain 200, in wired mode looks identical to the Kain 122.  When using it as a wireless mouse the cable simply unplugs and can either be plugged into a dongle, that can be placed near to where you are using the mouse, or the wireless receiver can be plugged straight into a USB port.  The Kain 200 uses a 2.4Ghz range for best-uninterrupted performance while stretching the battery life on its 1000 mAh battery as far as possible.  

Verdict

  For myself, who moves between peripherals on regular intervals for review purposes, but also try and keep a high level of skill in games like Rainbow Six Siege and Escape from Tarkov, changing a mouse can have a devastating impact on your performance.  Your mouse is your weapon and like soldiers, we spend many hours honing our skill with our weapon of choice, suddenly switching it out with another generally makes you play and aim worse.  My regular daily mouse is the legendary Logitech G903 lightspeed closely followed by the amazing Razer Viper Ultimate.  Both premium wireless mice.  The Roccat Kain 122 or wireless 200, can easily hold its own against the likes of these two heavyweights.  Jumping into my favorite games with the Kain 200 was an absolute blast.  I hardly noticed any adjustment time and the Owl-eye Sensor is fantastic feeling extremely accurate and true.  With its lesser focus on RGB and gadgets and more emphasis on creating a great experience while not being overly flashy, Roccat has created a spectacular mouse! If you are looking for a mouse, wired or wireless, that sits more in a mid-range price category while competing and beating many of the high-end gaming mice out there, then the Roccat Kain-range is definitely worth taking a look at.  If it is good enough for the Doc, to cause Violence, speed and momentum, then it is surely more than adequate for all of us!    

special thanks to Apex Interactive for the review content

 
Read more

Razer Huntsman Mini – Review

Technology has seen many trends relating to size.  There was a time that everything went smaller and smaller.  Phones became the size of pebbles.  Then as tech evolved more size increased again, to the point where its tough to distinguish whether your phone is a tablet or your tablet is a phone...     PC hardware is no different, but as a general rule of thumb, bigger is better.  Gaming keyboards were the keyboards that featured the most buttons and gadgets and even displays.  Endless amounts of programmable keys and USB ports galore.  With the increase in eSports and general competitive gaming to the masses so has the demand for more dedicated competitive keyboards.  Queue the 60% keyboards!

Design

For those who don't know, a 60% keyboard takes the footprint of a standard 115key keyboard and cuts 40% of it reducing it to roughly ~65keys depending on the keyboard.  This means that the Numpad and, usually, the arrow, scroll, delete etc keys will be removed or relocated and used in conjunction with a function key.  Taking this approach really is a big gamble if you are Razer or any brand in this case.  The 60% keyboard is very polarizing to the audience.  If you are a gamer only, the Huntsman mini will be a pleasure to use as it will provide you will much more mousepad real-estate to fling your mouse around on as well as being easier to pick up and take to your next LAN event.  On the flip side, for users who do not solely use they keyboard for gaming, productivity will take a knock, and even more so if you are someone who needs to enter numbers into fields often.     The Huntsman Elite, Razer's flagship keyboard has a list of features that is difficult to envision fitting on to a keyboard.  USB ports, media controls, volume dials, wrist rests, and the list continues.  The Huntsman Mini, however, is a stripped-down, bare-bones version.  Only sharing the name and optical switches from its feature-laden brother. The Huntsman Mini is clearly targeted to take the fight to the Ducky One keyboards and boasting impressive dimensions of 30 x 10 x 3cm it is definitely placing itself firmly in the fight.  The slightly raised keycaps allow for the Huntsman Mini's RGB to really show its true ability.  The keycaps themselves feel really solid and premium to touch and the cheeky font, when illuminated, looks really nice.  For the more keen-eyed, there is a subtle Razer inscription on the lip of the keyboard, and no more bombastic illuminating Razer logo. Looking to the bottom and the back of the Huntsman Mini, you will find the usual "For the Gamers by Gamers" pattern across the back.  The braided USB C-type cable, which is also interchangeable with other type-C, slots perfectly and clips in and out with ease, without feeling flimsy or like it might disconnect and the slightest tug.  There are also two sets of feet to raise the keyboard, 6- or 9 degrees respectively.     So you have the Razer Huntsman Mini but now you need to use your arrow keys or the delete key, what do you do?  Luckily Razer was merciful and provided for a Function key ( Fn) and adequate amount of side-printed functions.  These keys can easily be seen from a seated position and when the Fn key is pressed all illumination will be killed off and the function-binded keys will light up in white.  Apart from these keys you can do other things like changing preset RGB effects, do macro-binding or even use media keys using the Fn key.

Gaming and features

The biggest appeal of the Huntsman mini, apart from the size, would be the Purple optical switches.  For those who don't know the difference between Optical and mechanical, mechanical uses a mechanism to move the keycap down and activate a microswitch that is placed under the keycap.  Optical switches have a stem attached to the bottom of the keycap that, when pressed, will interrupt a light source.  This break in the light will then indicate a keypress, essentially making the response time, the speed of light.     When typing the optical switches, even though not mechanical, still give you a pleasant sound and resistance.  Just enough to give a sense of confidence when pressing but not too much to make it a pain.  The biggest pain with 60%'ers is to use some of the keys that are readily available on normal keyboards, you need to use the Fn key, so as mentioned before using the Huntsman mini for writing and office work could be a little more cumbersome. Moving to gaming, like what the Huntsman mini was intended for, it is fantastic.  For the first time, I have enough space on my desk to try turning my keyboard more towards the vertical orientation as many pro's do.  The new orientation does a lot for comfort and I would recommend it to most.  Something that I had to get used to is the short travel of the keys, (3.5mm) this had me moving sooner than anticipated and often losing gunfights while playing Rainbow Six Siege.  This has become a normal situation by reviewing peripherals and getting used to new mice and keys regularly.     The happy-medium of firm, yet soft, when it came to keypresses was greatly appreciated while playing Escape from Tarkov where the slightest accidental keypress can be the end of your raid.  Resting fingers on keys have often had me blowing my team, or myself, up with accidentally thrown grenades.  The Huntsman Mini keys are firm enough to provide rest for weary fingers without causing unpleasantries ingame. The Razer Huntsman Mini uses the same software as all the other mice and keyboards, Razer Synapse, is a rather simple to use software allowing you to tweak everything possible on the hardware.  But, seeing as the Huntsman mini is aimed at esports, Synapse is not needed for everything.  Although small, the Huntsman mini has space for 5 onboard profiles which include keybinds and RGB settings.

Verdict

The Razer Huntsman Mini is the first 60% keyboard the brand has released, and it is a successful one.  The Huntsman Mini feels very premium with its optical clicky switches and double-shot keycaps.  Although pricey, the feel of ease and confidence when pressing down on the keys make the price tag seem as little of a concern as that last enemy you shot. If optical switches are what you are after, and a 60%'er is something you are considering, the Razer Huntsman Mini is a no-brainer!  

 

Special thanks to Apex Interactive for supplying the hardware 

 
Read more

AOC CU34G2x – Review

Ultrawide monitors are generally seen to be for the users who either need the extra size for work, or for those who just want to stick with the latest trends, and can afford them.  So when AOC dropped the monstrous CU34G2x at my desk, I was rather excited to see what all the fuss is about. The AOC CU34G2X comes in a box that could easily hold the total contents of my wife's shoe cupboard and even just taking it out the box is a mission if you are like me, vertically challenged. The Ultrawide gaming monitor section has become flooded the last while which makes it really tough for new entries to really get a foothold in the market.  Unless companies take drastic measures with design, their product is bound to look similar, in some way, to the competition.  In recent times, the gaming monitor design has seen a red accent and RGB becomes the order of the day.  AOC however, decided that they might take a different approach.  Instead of trying to look different, they have decided to rather SHOW why they are different. With its minimal design and reserved looks, the AOC CU34G2X goes out of its way to show that it can fight with the more expensive monitors in the market today!  

Design

In a world where it seems like the only way to get approval from the community is to cram in the most ridiculous amounts of RGB, AOC has chosen a more "grown-up" look.  the straight and square lines, paired with the thin bezel, gives the CU34G2X a very office-friendly look.  Many of the newer monitors prefer to go with lighter bases and frames but AOC chooses to use metal which makes sure this monster display is not toppling over or going anywhere.  The footprint of the stand is also surprisingly shallow considering the size of the monitor.  This subtle design might not be for everyone.  If you are forking out a large sum of money, you want your purchase to stand out in a crowd.  The AOC doesn't do that, but rather keeps its head down and get the job done! What it lacks in lavish designs it definitely makes up for in features.  It packs a 34inch, QHD, 21:9 aspect ratio (3440x1440), 144Hz, and 1ms response time.  With a list of features like that its tough to not get excited.  Did I mention it's curved?  And it features Adaptive sync, which means Gsync and FreeSync are both catered for. But it does not end there, seeing as it is ultrawide, it allows for multiple inputs, these can come in the form of either HDMI (x2) or Display Port (x2).  With more than enough USB ports to cater to nearly every possible device, you may need to connect.

Performance

For someone like myself, who did not believe in ultrawide, and whether or not it is actually useful or just a nice to have, the AOC CU34G2X really has changed my mind for many reasons.  Not only is the curve (1500) enough to improve immersion, it is also not too much and when using it for mundane office work the 21:9 display makes having multiple tabs and/or spreadsheets open side-by-side an absolute dream!  Coming from a 27" QHD 144hz, 1ms monitor myself, I quickly realized how much I was truly missing out on, especially when it comes to the color gamut.  Straight out of the box, the colors seemed true and natural which means that AOC hit the color adjustments just right.  Playing some escape from Tarkov made me realize how dark certain parts of Interchange really should be.  After an adjustment period, the games felt significantly more vibrant thanks to the dark blacks and vibrant colors. Another feature of the AOC GU34G2X is the addition of HDR.  I have not experienced a true HDR monitor before so this was my first try.  When turning on HDR in Tomb Raider the visuals simply blew me away.  Colors and depth become amazingly clear.  I did however find that turning on the HDR setting on the monitor itself does make for a strange smudged effect on games that are not HDR supported.  

Features

The CU34G2X is crammed full of nifty dials and settings that you can set and play with.  Shadow control will improve visibility in darker games.  Color saturation will help get the perfect color pallets if the stock one doesn't suit your taste.  Crosshair overlays ( naughty), an fps counter, a few predefined picture modes such as FPS, RTS, racing, etc.  PIP, or Picture in Picture, is something that might seem silly when not using a bigger monitor.  I tested this feature while playing a game of golf on my Xbox One, which was connected via HDMI, and watched the F1 from my pc, connected via DP, on the same monitor with a PIP.PBP, Picture by Picture, is another nifty feature for those who already like to use a second monitor for work or play.  Now you can get rid of the second and use the ultrawide to provide you with enough screen to have moth displays on one.  Never Alt+tab to another window ever again.  Simply have both open next to each other! Adaptive Sync is also a big selling point for this monitor.  Apart from the long list of everything that makes the AOC CU34G2X remarkable already, the real deal for competitive gamers would be the AdaptiveSync.  Allowing the monitor to refresh at the rate at which the GPU provides the frames.  And AdaptiveSync caters for both Nvidia and AMD users alike.  No more upgrading GPU's and sticking to a brand due to the monitor you have.  

Final Verdict

The AOC CU34G2X ticks the boxes without stumbling.  The 34'' ultrawide display is wonderful, something I will be sad to see leave (maybe AOC will gift it to me?).  Make that display 144hz, give it 1ms response time, and 1440p...  There has to be a catch right?  R15 000, give or take some, in comparison to its competition, makes the AOC CU34G2X even more appealing.  The general look and feel will slot seamlessly into any work/office environment.  AdaptiveSync is simply a no-brainer these days and AOC has taken it upon themselves to provide it. Other than a slight improvement in the HDR technologies, which would bump the price significantly, and bumping the max brightness ever so slightly, the CU34G2X is a masterpiece and has been able to convince me, someone, who didn't believe in the "gimmick" of ultrawide, to rethinking life if I were to go back to a normal monitor...    

Special thanks to AOC for the review hardware

     
Read more

Logitech G502 Lightspeed – Review

Logitech has a pretty firm motto when it comes to their hardware.  If it ain't broken, don't fix it.  And the G502 is a prime example of this.  The first generation G502 came out in early 2016 and has endured, with some tweaks and upgrades, to still be a spectacular mouse in 2020. The most recent upgrade being the addition of Lightspeed.  Lightspeed is Logitech's wireless technology, and from past experiences, it is great.  So over its long and illustrious time on the shelf and in the hands of a plethora of gamers across the world, the basic design has not changed.  Apart from updating the Logitech logo, it is the same mouse on the outside as when it launched.  

Design

In the design department not much has really changed, as mentioned before, looks-wise, the only change you will see is the new Logitech emblem.  For those who don't know the G502, it is a right-handed, oddly shaped monster.  With many bulges and sharp edges protruding, it is not a mouse that would fit into an office environment but it sure will fit splendidly into any gaming setup.  The mixture of matte black and gloss inserts, as well as a significant thumb rest definitely, sets the G502 apart from all the other more "traditional" looking mice on the market.  The textured rubber on either side of the mouse provides adequate grip while note making it get sweaty in your hands after extended use. The G502 has extremely hard angles, which some might love, others will hate.  The top 2 programmable buttons that can be found next to the primary click buttons, seem like they are overhanging the edge of the mouse.  But thanks to the excellent build quality from Logitech these buttons do not seem to be going anywhere anytime soon!  These buttons, if not programmed, will function as the DPI up and down buttons giving it a nice easy feel instead of having to scroll through all your preset DPI's to eventually reach the first one you actually want.  These buttons are also designed to be used with your index finger rather than your thumb.     Your thumb has got more than enough work to do though.  Another two programmable keys are neatly tucked in the side of the mouse where your thumb can easily glide up to use them.  These buttons are perfectly placed and feel natural to press.  The third thumb button is an accuracy button which drops the DPI dramatically while holding the button pressed.  This is great when doing fine positioning in design work or when you need to get that perfect aiming accuracy in your favourite shooter.  The only problem with this button if you have smaller hands is that you might not be able to reach it without adjusting your grip.  This is not a mistake on Logitech but merely an example of how certain mice suite certain hand sizes as well as grips. For myself, with smaller hands, I found the size of the G502 to be perfect.  In the past, I have reviewed many smaller mice which do come in much lighter than the G502 but after extensive time spent using them, I found my hand would often ache.  The G502 has the perfect height in your palm and resting your hand on the mouse will have your fingers naturally land on the buttons, in my book, that's a win!     Turning the G502 and clipping off the magnetic bottom end shows you where the vast options of weights can be placed.  The G502, even when not weighted, still comes in at a hefty 121g, for some this might be the deal-breaker already!  Add in all the supplied weights and you looking at 139g.  The difference is that you can place the weights all around the mouse.  Making for many options such as weighting it front-back or side to side.

Features and changes

Like previously mentioned, on the outside the G502 doesn't look like it has changed much.  Internally, the G502 has seen the Hero sensor being added, which gave the G502 Hero status...  The G502 used to have a maximum DPI of 12 000, with the Hero sensor, that number bumps up to 16 000.  In reality, most people would never explore the higher ends of the DPI spectrum so if that is the only motivation for upgrading I would think you might be wasting your money. But the Lightspeed upgrade is what truly takes the G502 from good to great.  Logitech has been including their Lightspeed technology in many of their products of late, and from someone who always believed wired is best, I am now a Lightspeed-believer.  There truly is no input delay!  The G502 can work wired, but simply plugging the braided cable into the front of the mouse, or wireless in two separate ways.  Either plug the cable into the wireless receiver which houses the USB dongle, making so that the cable can be at hand when the battery does need a charge.  Or get rid of the cable and simply plug the dongle straight into a USB port.     Another massive upgrade in terms of longevity for nearly all of the Logitech items is the change to Omron switches.  Omron, being Logitech's own design bolsters the click life from 20 million to 50 million, that is a lot of clicks before they might give in.

Verdict

The G502 Lightspeed delivers in nearly every aspect you could ask for.  Cool design, check.  Comfort, check.  Great sensor, check. Wireless, check!  The only possible downfall for the G502 Lightspeed might be its slightly heavier build and the fact that it is not ambidextrous like many other mice are. But if you are in the market for a new gaming mouse that has more than enough features to keep to satisfied and happily clicking along for many moons to come, the G502 Lightspeed is the one you want to go for.  Not only does it look like its ready to go, it is! Logitech has taken a favourite and made it even more appealing to new users looking for their first gaming mouse, as well as the veterans who need a new mouse.    

Special thanks to Logitech for the review content

 
Read more

Logitech G Pro Wired – Review

The world of esports has seen a massive boost in recent years with every Tom, Dick, and metaphorical Harry, thinking they can be the very best like no one ever was...  Wow, I am old...  Anyway, enough Pokemon references.  Just like the players, so to have the peripheral companies jumped on the esports hype.  There are a few brands that do stand out a little more than others.  Logitech is one of those companies.  Producing hardware, especially mice and keyboards that some of the top teams swear by.  Their G Pro-Range, obviously aimed at the more competitive market, is testimony to why less is more and expensive is not always better! The G Pro has been around for some time now, and from the look of this year's one, not much has changed.  It still sports the same design and 6 button layout.  But what you don't see from just looking, is what is happening on the insides.  The latest version of the G Pro wired & wireless both feature Logitechs latest sensor, the Hero sensor (High-Efficiency Rated Optical).  This alone should be reason enough to take another look at the G Pro, as the Hero sensors are simply astounding.  Pair this with the new Omron keys and you have a winner!  Did I mention it nearly weighs nothing? Although most of us won't ever experience what it is like to be in a professional gaming organization due to various factors such as general lack of skill or being on the wrong side of 17 years old, professional-grade gaming hardware is none the less very exciting and interesting and for those of us who want that slight edge on the competition.  

Design

The Logitech G Pro Wired design does not reinvent the wheel by any means, it is a round-shaped, medium-sized right-handed mouse.  with two addressable keys on the inside of the mouse.  Obviously a lot of focus has gone into the Hero sensor that allows for a DPI setting of between 100 and 16 000.  Maybe I am just not worthy, but there is no world in which I can fathom ever needing DPI setting anywhere near 100 or 16k, but alas, the G Pro can go for the whole range.  Personally, I keep the DPI settings ranged between 800 and 1600 with 200 intervals, all of which I save on the quick-change slots that the G Pro has.     The G Pro is also fitted with the durable Omron keys that are rated for 50 million clicks.  This gives the G Pro even more of an advantage over the competition.  The Omron switches allow for an extremely fast actuation as well as moving back to a position just as quickly.  Meaning clicks are more precise and more on time.   The choice in heavy or light mouse choice is very much up to the user, but the Logitech G Pro wired comes in at a measly 83g.  Some might consider this too light, and at first, I would have to have agreed.  But giving it some time, and getting used to how easily it glides across the mousepad I can now understand why many would prefer the lighter mice.

Software

  When I first started using Logitech G Hub I found it to be cumbersome.  But after comparing it to some of the other brand offerings I came to realize that it was actually one of the easier packages to use.  Using it on the G Pro was not going to add fireworks and unicorns to the functionality of the mouse.  Instead, the G Pro is rather bare when it comes to the software.  The Hub allows you to tweak your DPI settings, calibrate the G Pro to the mousepad that you are currently using, and lastly customize the RGB effect of the swooping strip that hugs the bottom half of the mouse, as well as the Logitech emblem that will sit firmly in the centre of your palm when using it.  The RGB options are rather limited but generally, the colours are extremely vibrant and bright.

Gaming

    I took the G Pro wired for a spin while playing some games such as Rainbow 6 Siege, Escape from Tarkov, and Assassins Creed: Origins.  In games like Origins and other slower-paced RPG titles the G Pro did come up lacking compared to the G903 which I use as my daily mouse, the G Pro lacks the extra buttons which come in handy when casting spells and using potions in games such as World of Warcraft.  Switching over to first-person shooters is where the G Pro really shines.  The extremely accurate sensor and masterfully crafted Omron keys make aiming and clicking heads an absolute dream!  Once I found my sweet spot in terms of DPI, my accuracy started climbing dramatically and I was feeling like a casual king.

Verdict

Logitech has certainly come close to perfecting the light-weight gaming mouse and the G Pro atones to that.  If you are in the market for an esports-ready gaming mouse and you don't want to break the bank in doing so, there are a good few to choose from.  Razer has the Deathadder, Corsair has the M65, but none of them quite have the pedigree of the G Pro.  The G Pro has been kicking butt and taking names by the likes of Navi, G2 eSports, and TSM, to name but a few.  If big names like that believe in the power of the G Pro, why shouldn't we? At the end of the day, the G Pro comes in at a good price, provides excellent comfort, and a tremendous performance from the HERO sensor as well as the Omron switches.    

Special thanks to Logitech for the review content

Read more

Mediabox MBX4K Ranger – Review

I am not the biggest of fans of media boxes.  I am even less proficient at anything Android.  Yes, yes I am one of those people who prefer their devices to be of the fruit variant.  Call me a snob so we might move on.  When Apex Interactive sent me the Mediabox MBX4K Ranger to try, I was in two minds.  This being my first review of a device like this, and also my first real-time spent on an Android platform. Before we dive into the details of the MBX4K Ranger here are some of the technical specs:
  • Model: Mediabox Ranger MBX4K Ranger
  • CPU: Arm Quad 64-bit Cortex-A53 up to 1.5GHz
  • OS: Android 8.0 TV
  • Video: HDMI 2.0b
  • Audio: Audio over HDMI or Optical with Dobly support
  • Video: Up to 4K @ 60fps
  • Wifi: 2.4GHz/5GHz 802.11 a/b/c/g/n/ac
  • Ethernet: Yes -10M/100M
  • Power: 5v/2A 8w usage
  • Ram: 2GB DDR
  • Storage: 8GB flash expandable
The MBX4K Ranger is a neatly packaged box that comes with the actual device, the power cord, HDMI cable, a quick start guide, and a sleek, voice controllable remote.  The MBX4K is a sleek black box with a red accent at the bottom.  On the front, there is the power light, red for standby, blue for on.   The design is discrete and the box itself is the size of one's palm which allows it to be easily placed in any home setup without being ugly or cumbersome.  On the side, the media box comes with 2x USB ports and an SD slot for storage expansion.  The remote is a sleek and stylish black remote featuring the usual power, scroll, and select buttons, but this model also features Google Assistant, which really is a wonderful feature.  Simply press the Google Assistant button on the controller and speak into the controller.  Want to watch Youtube, simply tell the remote so, and it will be!

Setting up and getting watching

For Android users, the setup should be simple to navigate.  The interface is smooth and fast, the only possible downfall is the onscreen keyboard that is not qwerty but rather alphabetical (who types that way?).   This can easily be solved by using another android device to do the setup.  A quick link of your android account and sign in to the usual apps is a breeze.  The general navigation and use of the MBX4K Ranger feel fast, responsive, and snappy.  The MBX4K Ranger comes pre-installed with a few of the standard apps such as DSTV Now, Youtube, and Showmax, other standards in my household is Twitch and VLC, all of which were easily found and installed and were working within a few minutes. 4K HDR is something that not many of the more "budget-friendly" media boxes can brag about.  I don't have a 4K HDR TV myself so I had to take the MBX4K Ranger for a little road trip to someone who does.  I was optimistic but pleasantly surprised when I turned on the HDR feature in the settings and selected a 2160p@60fps and it worked...  It does however cause the whole UI to be in HDR which can make some things look slightly strange.  But the fact that the HDR actually works already is a big bonus for the MBX4K Ranger.

Android 8 TV ( no Netflix on MBX4K Ranger store, unfortunately)

  So to this point, the MBX4K Ranger has been ticking the boxes and becoming a very comfortable unit in my living room.  Until my missus wanted to watch some Netflix.  No problem, surely this box of tricks will run Netflix.... right? Wrong!  The Netflix app is not natively supported but Android 8.0 TV which is actually rather infuriating as it had been performing so well to this point.  I took to the web to find out about possible ways to get it working, thinking that my non-Android brain was obviously doing something wrong.  Going straight to the FAQs on the MBX4K Ranger site I found some manuals on how to use third-party stores to install a "cracked" version on the MBX4K Ranger.  Another option being, downloading a Netflix APK and manually installing it.   After many hours and many cuss words, I finally gave up and accepted my fate, no Netflix.

But can it Kodi?

I am sure most people buying the MBX4K Ranger would be considering it for Kodi.  I am very pleased to tell you Kodi 18 installs straight from the Play Store without the slightest of problems and runs without any sort of hiccup!  You will still need to perform some sort of wizardry to get all the Repositories working and they will be laggy but as for the app itself, it works seamlessly!  

Verdict

The MBX4K Ranger is by no means the perfect all-in-one media box.  Small issues such as the lack of a web browser, which could have ticked the Netflix box in an alternative way, Wifi disconnects and just general lack of freedom that you would normally expect from devices running any form of Android OS.  The lack of Netflix compatibility is what really got me!  The MBX4K Ranger navigates and runs tremendously well and the clean look and feel to the UI does make it look professional and seem much more high-end than what the price tag suggests.  The remote is really wonderful and I even like it more than the Apple TV remote.  Throw in the Google Assistant and the controller is amazing! It does however run HDR which is better than most!  Kodi works like a charm, DSTV Now, Youtube, Showmax all run without any issues!   If Mediabox can provide an update that will allow us to natively run Netflix without performing any rocket-science, the MBX4K Ranger will be the flagship media box for those who are willing to part with their other, more premium, branded boxes.  

The MBX4K Ranger retails for R1 499 at various retailers

       

Special thanks to Apex Interactive for the review hardware

 
Read more